Articles Posted in Tips

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As a personal injury attorney in North Carolina, I hear this from clients all the time.  Unfortunately, in most cases, it is not true.  At the very least, it is not what they believe it to be.  In North Carolina, as in most states, you are required to purchase auto insurance to legally be allowed to drive on public roadways.  Each state sets its own requirement as to the minimum amount of insurance and type of insurance that you must purchase to be a legal driver.  The primary purpose of these requirements is to protect innocent persons from your negligent driving.  In North Carolina it is called the Motor Vehicle Financial Responsibility Act and can be found at NCGS §20-279.21.

North Carolina requires that all drivers carry at least $30,000 in liability insurance.  This is sometimes referred to as “minimum limits” or a “30/60” policy.  That means that you only carry the minimum amount of auto liability coverage required by law in North Carolina.  Under a minimum limits policy, the most any one injured claimant can collect is $30,000 and there is only $60,000 in available liability coverage for all the claimants involved in an accident.  For example, if you, your spouse and your children are involved in a car accident and spouse and children of the at-fault driver are in the other vehicle, there is a total of $60,000 in available liability coverage for all seven claimants (assuming two children in each car).  With the costs of health care rising, if all seven claimants are transported by ambulance and get checked out at the hospital, you can easily see how quickly that $60,000 is exhausted, let alone if there are any serious injuries or follow up visits are needed, or worse, if someone dies as a result of the accident.  None of those factors change the amount of money available to the claimants in a minimum limits policy.

As such, it is highly recommended that you carry as much auto liability coverage as you can afford.  There are two reasons for this.  One is that most people do not go out and intend to cause a collision.  They generally the result of negligence.  Think of all the things people have to distract them, even momentarily, the radio, the weather, the other cars on the road, GPS, eating or drinking, texting, talking on the phone, children, the list goes on and on.  As such, if you have assets that you want to protect, you should carry higher liability limits so that claimants can focus on your insurance coverage instead of trying to get money from you directly.  The second reason is that, in general, you have to carry higher liability coverage in order to purchase higher Uninsured (does not have insurance) or Under-insured Motorist Coverage (does not have enough insurance to fully compensate you for your damages), both of which help to protect YOU and your family.

If you have ever ridden a motorcycle, chances are you’ve heard the phrase “loud pipes save lives.” If not, you might have heard a motorcyclist say it in defense of their loud exhaust pipes. So, is this statement true?

Well, in fact, this statement does hold truth.

Attentive Driving is More Than Looking

For the most part, motorists drive defensively to avoid accidents with other passenger vehicles and trucks. However, many times, motorcycles aren’t even on their radar. This is one of the leading causes of accidents between cars and motorcycles.

Motorcycles are the most susceptible to severe and even fatal injuries. With this in mind, drivers should always be actively looking for all sorts of vehicles on the road, including motorcycles.

In events when this isn’t the case, there are ways that motorcyclists can help keep themselves safe by increasing their visibility to drivers who aren’t necessarily looking for them.

If you’ve been injured on the job, you’ll want to file a workers’ compensation claim in order to get the care and treatment you’re entitled to. However, insurance companies and employers don’t want to pay for claims they don’t have to, so the burden may fall on you to prove that you’ve suffered the severe injuries you’re claiming. That means you’ll need evidence, and there are certain types of evidence that are particularly effective when it comes to supporting your claim and getting you the result you’re looking for.

Here are four important types of evidence to have when filing your workers’ compensation claim.

Medical Records

When you’ve been injured, you’ll want to make sure you see a medical professional and have your case documented as soon as possible. You’ll likely have to see a doctor multiple times for continued treatment, and each time your doctor will log your condition, how your recovery is progressing, and much more. This is critical because it not only documents how your recovery is proceeding, but what treatments have been done, and what your doctor’s recommendations are.

Many people ride motorcycles recreationally and as a means of transportation. While they can be enjoyable, they can also be dangerous. Riders do not have the physical protection that vehicles provide and are therefore more susceptible to injuries if they are involved in a collision.

Helmets are one of the ways that motorcyclists avoid sustaining injuries in these instances, but not everyone feels the need to wear them. There are different laws, both federally and at a state level, that determine when a motorcyclist is required to wear a helmet.

History of Helmet Laws

Most people don’t know road clippings in the street could cause any sort of hazard or legal trouble. It sounds innocent enough. Many will leave their road trimmings scattered about the roadway, yet recently, concerns about them have begun to arise. Online debates have taken place as to the legality of this practice, with many residents arguing that there is no such law to prohibit putting your day’s grass clippings in the road. So why is this causing such a heated debate?

Road Hazards

Besides the obvious aesthetics of grass in the road that some may not like, the real hazard of lawn clippings in the road comes from the slipperiness that the grass can cause, especially for motorcycle riders. On a curve, or even on a straightaway, riding over grass trimmings is no different than riding in the rain. There’s less friction between the ground and wheels. Motorcycles have two wheels and have a harder time balancing, so the risk of getting into an accident is that much higher for them.

At The Law Offices of Jason E. Taylor, we are dedicated to helping clients throughout North and South Carolina who have been injured in devastating car accidents. Car accidents are one of the leading causes of injury in the United States. In 2015, 123,589 people suffered serious car accident injuries, while 1,380 were killed in traffic accidents in North Carolina.

Now that Labor Day Weekend is approaching, it is important to know how to keep you and your family safe when you are on the road. Because Labor Day Weekend is one of the deadliest times of the year, we want to take the time to discuss accident statistics for Labor Day Weekend.

Consider the following accident statistics before you get behind the wheel this holiday weekend:

Motorcycle

When the days are short and the weather frigid, motorcyclists who want to keep riding need to take extra precautions to try to avoid weather-related accidents.

Here are eight ways you can reduce your chances of sustaining an injury in a motorcycle accident this winter.

Wear Bright Colors, Especially When Snow is on the Ground

During the short days of winter, more motorists are on the road at dusk and dawn when changing light conditions make it harder to see. Motorcyclists should wear bright colors to make themselves as visible as possible.

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The most recent statistics about motorcycle accidents in North Carolina show that more than eight out of 10 motorcycle wrecks result in injuries. There are far fewer motorcycle accident fatalities, but they still occur at a rate of about two dozen a month during the summer.

The N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles says there were 3,893 motorcycle accidents in North Carolina in 2013, the latest DMV statistics available. Of these, 81 percent resulted in an injury and 154 crashes caused someone’s death. Many accidents are caused frankly by other motorists who fail to stay alert for motorcyclists. But it’s still the bikers who typically pay the price for another motorist’s mistake, especially in a collision with a car or truck.

The same report also shows 656 moped accidents with 571 injuries (87 percent) and 25 fatal crashes, and 173 motor scooter or motor bike accidents, with 154 injuries (89 percent) and nine fatalities.

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