Articles Tagged with drivers

You’ve all seen it.  The car swerving ahead of you.  The car drifting into your lane.  The car slamming on brakes at the last minute to avoid the line of stopped traffic.  When you pass by, if you are lucky enough to get by them safely, you see the driver’s head looking straight down at their cell phone actively scrolling their social media or text messages, and ignoring the rest of us on the road.  Not a care in the world except to be intently focused on the latest happenings on social media.

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The most recent statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration report that only about 3% of drivers are using cell phone or other electronic devices while driving.  I, for one, do not believe this for a minute.  There is not a day that goes by where I do not see multiple people drifting from their lanes and fully absorbed in their cell phone while driving.  Each day seems to be worse than the previous day.  People are addicted to their Fakebook (you know people are lying about their perfect seeming lives on Facebook, right?) or Instagram accounts.

Cell phone use while driving is dangerous and is considered distracted driving.  Distracted driving accounted for 3166 deaths in 2017 and would appear to be on the rise as we all witness more and more distracted drivers in our daily commutes.  We often perceive distracted driving to be centered around the use of a cell phone while driving, but it can also include eating, talking to passengers, adjusting the radio, or fumbling for other control devices on your dashboard.   In 2017, there were also 599 non-occupants killed in distracted driving crashes which are typically unsuspecting pedestrians, bicyclists, and others just minding their own business.

BLUE LIGHTS – EMPTY WALLETS

IF YOU USE A CELL PHONE WHILE DRIVING IN NORTH CAROLINA

A bill has been introduced in the North Carolina General Assembly to make it a crime to use your cell phone while driving.  House Bill 144 would outlaw “distracted driving” and impose penalties that increase with subsequent offenses.  Beginning December 1, 2019, the police will have reason to pull over drivers who use their hands to engage in distracted behavior that impairs their operation of a motor vehicle.  The definition includes the use of a handheld mobile telephone or handheld electronic device.  If you receive one of these tickets, then be prepared to spend a pretty penny because the infraction carries a $100 fine in addition to the costs of court which boosts the total cost of a citation to nearly $300.  If you receive a second offense, then the fine goes up as well as carrying insurance points which will also cost you more money.  If you don’t learn a lesson from the previous two tickets, then you can expect a $200 fine, court costs, and 2 insurance points for another offense within 3 years.

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